Science- Asian Tapir Infographic

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Science- Enzymes and Test Preparation

Tests are going to be a big part of life in the diploma program. Most of the time will be used to revise for these tests that is going to account for 75% of the final grade. I revise for my test in quite a lot of different ways. First I like to revise on my own and try to remember what I can. But as I start to get to questions where I do not know the answer to, I will start to ask my class mates for the answer. For this test I was fortunate enough to revise together with some friends and this helped me as they can help test my knowledge and also correct something if I get it wrong. I also have some friends in year 12 who take biology, I would sometimes ask them questions that my classmates wouldn’t know the answer to. They would give me good answers and sometimes even more than I ask for, learning more in the process. I tend to be too confident in knowing everything and sometimes I think I know the subject, but when getting quizzed by my class mate I would not get everything right. This is why I like getting quizzed so I can know what I actually know and don’t know. This method seems to work for me and I would like to continue to use this for next year.

The essay really gave me good insight on biotechnology and how enzymes makes the world a better place. But it can also cause a lot of ethical and social issues that everyone has a different view to. Even though its helping the world, it is also starting a lot of debates that are very hard to conclude. Doing some further reading, I have realized that there are so much more interesting information about enzymes that we didn’t cover. Things like the metabolic pathways and also the induced fit model, these concepts might be hard to get but they were very interesting to read about. I would like to explore this further on my own and just read about the things that interest me.

Science- Teaching Waves

Having a full 80 minutes of class to teach doesn’t seem like a hard thing to do, but when you actually get down and start planning the lesson it gets hard, that is why we were lucky enough to work in groups of 3s and 4s. My topic of teaching waves was “Standing Waves” and I got the job of teaching the formula of standing waves. The formula of standing waves wasn’t a hard one and it is based on what we have learnt before so it makes my teaching a bit easier. Before the teaching day all of our group members got together and talked about our class and made a final plan and procedure of what everyone was going to do. We created a Dropbox so everyone can place their bibliography and power point slides in one place. At home when we couldn’t reach each other that easily a Facebook chat was created so we can talk to each other and this would avoid some group members not getting the information.

The whole period went well, the feed back I got was all very positive. They all said that the formula was well explained and easy to understand. Everyone liked how some questions were done as a class and the math was shown step by step, this would help some people that might not be as strong in math. The step by step would give them a clearer understanding of how the answer is found. Some suggestions for improvement got was to add some harder questions types next time as most of the questions are simple ones with only a few complex questions at the end. Most people didn’t feel that they could answer a level 6 question in a test so that is something I must consider next time I teach a lesson.

Overall our group collaborated well and communicated well with each other which helped us to succeed in this lesson.

Science- Example Criteria D

Research Question: (The question your experiment is going to be based on, should be a “How does (independent variable) affect (dependent variable?)

How does adding different amount of acid to a copper oxide affect the acidic level of the solution?

Independent Variable: (This is the variable that you are going to change in the experiment, should have 5 different variations of this variable)

The amount of hydrochloric acid going to be added into the copper oxide solution (10ml, 15ml, 20ml, 25ml, 30ml).

 

Dependent Variable: (This is the variable that you are going to measure in the experiment)

The acidic level of the solution measured using a pH probe in molar.

Controlled Variable: (The variables that you are going to keep the same so your experiment doesn’t become unfair, also state how you are going to control this variable in the experiment, you should have at least 3 controlled variables)

  • The type of acid– The acid will be kept the same because different type of acids would have a different molar level. The acid we will use would be hydrochloric acid (0.1ml).
  • The amount of copper oxide– The amount of copper oxide will be kept the same at 5 grams because if the amount changes then the acidic level can also change.
  • The temperature of the solution– The temperature is important to keep the same because it can directly affect how fast and when the reaction would appear, this is why the test would be conducted in room temperature.

Hypothesis: (This is where you predict with scientific proof what you would think would happen in your experiment, use “I think that as you change (IV) the effect on the (DV) will be…”, include in-text citation and if a diagram helps explain, then include one or even a sketch graph)

We predict that as you raise the level of acid the effect on the acidic level would be more neutralized because adding acid to the copper oxide would make the solution much more neutralized.

Apparatus/ Equipment: (This is where you list the equipment or materials you need, include quantities and sizes)

Material/ Equipment

Amount/ quantity needed

Beaker

1

Test tube

5

Measuring Cylinder

1

Spatula

1

Hydrochloric acid

200ml

Copper oxide

100grams

pH probe

1

Method: (Your method should be in steps and it should be very detailed, from ¾ to a whole page. Instructional language would be appropriate here, also state how you are going to control your controlled variables)

  1. Measure out 10ml of hydrochloric acid and place it in a test tube.
  2. Using the pH probe measure the acidic level of the acid.
  3. Measure out 5 grams of copper oxide.
  4. Place the copper oxide into the test tube with the acid, stir until crystals are formed.
  5. Use the pH probe to measure out the final acidic level of the acid.
  6. Repeat steps 1 to 5 for another 4 times, record all data in the results table below.
  7. Measure out 15ml of hydrochloric acid and place it in a test tube.
  8. Repeat steps 2 to 5 for 5 times; making sure its 15ml of acid not 10ml, record all data in the results table below.
  9. Measure out 20 ml of hydrochloric acid and place it in a test tube.
  10. Repeat steps 2 to 5 for 5 times; making sure its 20ml of acid not 15ml, record all data in the results table below.
  11. Measure out 25 ml of hydrochloric acid and place it in a test tube.
  12. Repeat steps 2 to 5 for 5 times; making sure its 25ml of acid not 20ml, record all data in the results table below.
  13. Measure out 30 ml of hydrochloric acid and place it in a test tube.
  14. Repeat steps 2 to 5 for 5 times; making sure its 30ml of acid not 25ml, record all data in the results table below.

Results Table

Amount of HCl (ml)

Trials (ml)

1

2

3

4

5

10
15
20
25
30

Science- Criteria D Template

Research Question: (The question your experiment is going to be based on, should be a “How does (independent variable) effect (dependent variable?)

_________________________________________________________________

Independent Variable: (This is the variable that you are going to change in the experiment, should have 5 different variations of this variable)
__________________________________________________________________________________

Dependent Variable: (This is the variable that you are going to measure in the experiment)
__________________________________________________________________________________

Controlled Variable: (The variables that you are going to keep the same so your experiment doesn’t become unfair, also state how you are going to control this variable in the experiment, you should have at least 3 controlled variables)

__________________________________________________________________________________
__________________________________________________________________________________
__________________________________________________________________________________
__________________________________________________________________________________

Hypothesis: (This is where you predict with scientific proof what you would think would happen in your experiment, use “I think that as you change (IV) the effect on the (DV) will be…”, include in-text citation and if a diagram helps explain, then include one or even a sketch graph)

__________________________________________________________________________________

Apparatus/ Equipment: (This is where you list the equipment or materials you need, include quantities and sizes)

Material/ Equipment

Amount/ quantity needed

 . .
 . .
 . .
 . .
 . .
 . .
 . .

 

Method: (Your method should be in steps and it should be very detailed, from ¾ to a whole page. Instructional language would be appropriate here, also state how
you are going to control your controlled variables)

  1. ___________________________________________________________________________
  2. ___________________________________________________________________________
  3. ___________________________________________________________________________
  4. ___________________________________________________________________________
  5. ___________________________________________________________________________
  6. ___________________________________________________________________________
  7. ___________________________________________________________________________
  8. ___________________________________________________________________________
  9. ___________________________________________________________________________
  10. ___________________________________________________________________________
  11. ___________________________________________________________________________
  12. ___________________________________________________________________________
  13. ___________________________________________________________________________
  14. ___________________________________________________________________________
  15. ___________________________________________________________________________
  16. ___________________________________________________________________________
  17. ___________________________________________________________________________
  18. ___________________________________________________________________________

Results Table

Independent Variable (units)

Trials (Unit)

1

2

3

4

5

Variation 1
Variation 2
Variation 3
Variation 4
Variation 5

 

 

 

 

Science- Blood Glucose Regulation, The Dog Game

After playing the dog game, I didn’t really learn a lot from it. I knew from before that high sugar levels are caused by eating foods with high sugar levels. So the dog’s sugar levels rose when sugary food was given to him. When the blood sugar got very high a insulin shot was given to get the dog’s sugar level back to it’s normal percentage. But I did not know what an insulin was because I did not bother to read the instructions that was very long.

After the lesson, I learned that if blood sugar levels are high then insulin is released by the pancreas which travels in the blood. The target organs for insulin are the liver and muscles. Insulin converts glucose to glycogen which is stored in the liver and  muscles. On the other hand when blood sugar levels are low for example after exercise, the body can be sleepy and have slow reactions times. The body uses negative  feedback by releasing glucagon from the pancreas. This travels all around the body but at the target organs of the liver and muscles, the glucagon converts the stored glycogen into glucose. When sugar levels are too low this is call hypoglycemia.

Overall I think that educational games aren’t such a good idea, especially when there is a lot of words to read.

Science- Atoms Everywhere

Atoms are everywhere. They are the building blocks of everything at are around us. They are in our food, in our clothes and in our cars. Without atoms, nothing can exist.

When we hare the word atom, we immediately think of a old mad scientist in a chemistry lab doing some crazy experiments. But atoms doesn’t only relate to chemistry, it also relates to all of the other topics in science class, like physics and biology.

Atoms in physics is something really interesting, and a great example of atoms in physics is the Large Hadron Collision (LHC). It is the worlds largest and highest- energy partial accelerator. This machine helps physicists answer some of the most fundamental questions of physics. It is 27 kilometers long, spanning over 3 countries. Here is a short video on how the LHC work:

For more information on LHC’s visit The Particle Adventure website.

Have you ever wondered how plants got energy from the sun? Well that is the magic of photosynthesis. Photosynthesis is the the work of atoms.  The plants chemically breaks down the suns rays and convert it into energy. The sun produces enough energy a hour that it can power the whole earth for a whole year! This is why scientists are trying to replicate what the plants do, so we can have an unlimited energy source for us to take from. Solar panels are the first step for achieving this goal. As technology develops further, scientist will eventually achieve this goal.

So how does it work? Well… you have to read it yourself here.